Lights! Camera! Action! at the Hamilton Film Centre

Lights! Camera! Action! at the Hamilton Film Centre

Photo by George Qua-Enoo

by Tyler Fish

Aspiring young actors, presenters, and film aficionados in Hamilton can finally learn the essentials of acting at the Hamilton Film Centre.

The HFC is the brainchild of two Crown Point residents: Juno Rinaldi and Shaun Smyth. Juno came up with the content for a six-week acting course while working as a shoe-shiner in Toronto between acting gigs. Held at the Theatre Aquarius gym and presented by Luke Brown, the course sold out quickly, showing the considerable demand for this type of programming in Hamilton. Juno and Shaun first met through a mutual friend at a Christmas party. When they ran into each other again at the Stoney Creek pool, they agreed to partner and run the new HFC.

They certainly have the experience. Juno, who had her first leading role while still in Grade 12, currently stars as Frankie on the new CBC hit Workin’ Moms. Shaun has more than 20 years of acting experience spread over a wide variety of shows and plays. He stars as Theo Fleury in Playing With Fire, an award-winning one-man show that is performed entirely on skates.


Read the rest of the story with your copy of The Point coming in February.

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We made a mistake

Every two months we pull together another issue of The Point and get it delivered to thousands of homes in Crown Point. One of the coolest aspects of putting together the newspaper is that we don’t have any production meetings. We do everything over the Internet using a combination of free and subscribed software. The by-lines on the stories and the photo credits and all of the production effort listed on the boilerplate represent many volunteer hours.

Sometimes in the process, we make mistakes. We made one such mistake with the current issue. The people who provide us with content deserve recognition and credit. Without them, we have no paper.

A photograph was submitted to the Business Profile for In Fine Feather Yoga, page 7, that was not credited.  The photographer was Jay Crews. The photo caption would have identified Helena McKinney who owns and operates In Fine Feather Yoga and who provided the answers in the Q and A format.

The missing photo credit and caption and any other omissions should have been caught and corrected during the proofreading process. It was not and The Point team regret the error.

Please learn about In Fine Feather Yoga and other people and businesses in our community.  The newspaper is available for download in PDF format: https://thepointhamilton.files.wordpress.com/2017/12/the-point-decjan-print.pdf

A SoBi success story

A SoBi success story

by Thea Jones

March 20th, 2017, marked Hamilton Bike Share’s (SoBi Hamilton’s) second birthday. We celebrated our terrific twos with a Glowride and a bonfire at Beasley Park. Since launching in 2015 SoBi has increased its ridership to about 18,000 riders and changed the way Hamiltonians get around. While the initial launch captured priority neighbourhoods identified by the Neighbourhood Action Strategy, we have continued to work towards bike accessibility in all neighbourhoods within our service area. SoBi Hamilton’s current service area is bounded by Ottawa Street to the east, Dundas to the west, the harbour to the north, and the escarpment to the south.

This summer we celebrated the launch of the expanded Everyone Rides Initiative (ERI). The ERI is geared towards making the program more equitable by removing barriers to accessing bike share. That means we provide SoBi memberships to organizations and individuals in need at subsidized rates. We also provide education opportunities to all ERI riders, including workshops on how to ride. We have a robust newcomers program called New Communities that offers ERI programming and workshops in Arabic.

To receive a subsidized membership the rider must participate in a Bike Share Basics workshop.


Get your copy of The Point coming in December to get the whole story.

The Point is a community-driven volunteer effort supported through advertising. See the links on the left to learn more.

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The Dickens, you say

The Dickens, you say

Photo courtesy of the Hamilton Public Library, Local History and Archives

by Brendan Oliver

Long ago, in a small brick cottage on Kensington Avenue North, there lived a man with a famous connection. The gentleman’s name was Mr. William Dickens and he was the first cousin once removed of Charles Dickens, the author of such classics as Oliver Twist and A Christmas Carol.

William Dickens was born in Braunston, Northamptonshire, England in 1843 and was the second of 14 children. His father George Dickens was a first cousin of the famous author. George worked as a merchant and also kept the Admiral Nelson, a pub that still operates next to the Grand Union Canal in Braunston.

While on a boat journey from London to Birmingham in 1851, Charles Dickens walked into the Admiral Nelson and immediately recognized his cousin, George. As the two conversed, William stood close to his father’s side. Before departing Charles patted young William on the back and told him he must grow up to be a better man than his father.


Get your copy of The Point coming in December to get the whole story.

The Point is a community-driven volunteer effort supported through advertising. See the links on the left to learn more.

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From happiness to joy

From happiness to joy

Feature photo by Gord Moss

by Michelle Martin

Laura Keating is a Crown Point singer-songwriter whom I have known for many years as my children’s piano teacher and mother of my son’s buddy, Ben. Interviewing her about her debut CD Let me Tell You, I got to know Laura Keating, folk-rock artist. We lost track of time talking about the challenges of parenting and working, love and loss, her musical family history, and her vision as an artist singing songs to Hamilton and beyond.

She started out in radio, writing advertising copy and “singing the odd jingle” for CFTJ in Cambridge (long since swallowed up by a larger network). From there it was on to advertising at Eaton’s—another long-gone establishment, we laughed—where she “loved the fact that it was a big team of writers, working on coming up with different themes, working with layout artists,” and even attending a Chanel launch with models, flashbulbs, and flowing champagne. Next it was on to less glamourous but similar work for Lansing Buildall, then staying home to raise four boys.

And where was the music in all of this? “I came from a musical family. All my brothers are professional musicians; it was always in front of me.” Her first instrument was a guitar.


Get your copy of The Point coming in December to get the whole story.

The Point is a community-driven volunteer effort supported through advertising. See the links on the left to learn more.

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To age or not to age

To age or not to age

by Deborah Lebaron

The process of aging is different for each person. Genetics, gender, and the lifestyle a person has lived all have an impact on how we age. There are some things we can’t change (genetics, for example) but we do have some control over lifestyle. If a person is lucky enough to be in good health as he or she gets older, aging will probably entail fewer disadvantages than it will for a person in poor health.

As we age, we have less resilience. This means that we bounce back less easily when illness strikes. This, for example, is one of the reasons why doctors recommend flu shots for those over 65, particularly those with chronic conditions.

Once we stop working or reduce our working hours, our financial situations will change. When we rely on pensions, our income is fixed and that probably means readjusting how we spend money. Let me tell you, though, that a person does not instantly lose interest in shopping, whether for books, clothes or gadgets, at the magic age of 65.

There are some financial benefits for seniors. GO fares are reduced; bank fees may be eliminated; Denninger’s (King Street) offers 10% off on Tuesdays. The Ontario Drug Benefit program covers many prescription drugs. Many recreation centres offer reduced rates for seniors. These reductions kick in at different ages: check with each institution individually. It is always worth checking with any service company to see whether there is a reduction for seniors. It may not be much but every bit counts.

For those who want to remain at home as they age, financial assistance is available, in the form of tax relief, when a home is retrofitted with safety/accessibility measures to allow a person to age in place (Healthy Homes Renovation Tax Credit).

It can be difficult to accept or ask for help. The first time someone stands up to give you a seat on the bus is a watershed moment. A tip for someone who wants to help an older friend or neighbour: offer specific help; don’t just say ‘call me if you need anything’. For example, if you are going grocery shopping, call and offer a ride or say that you will pick up groceries for the person.

All the good advice about lifestyle applies to seniors as much as to anyone else: eat a healthy diet; don’t smoke (or quit/reduce smoking); exercise; and maintain social connections with family and friends.

In the end, death comes to us all. We may wish to avoid thinking about death or discussing death with our families, but it is important to make sure that our families know our wishes when it comes to managing illness and planning funerals. Funerals are like weddings: they can be quite inexpensive or enormously extravagant. Decide what you want and let people know.

Aging provides the opportunity to see what happens to the young people in our lives. It may give us the opportunity to consider our lives and how we live. It gives us time for activities we enjoy.

Life doesn’t stop at age 65, but it does change. We will generally feel better about those changes if we are involved in making the decisions.

Deborah LeBaron has lived in Crown Point for eighteen years and contributes to The Point as a writer and volunteer.

CLSA: Bringing research home

CLSA: Bringing research home

by Sherly Kyorkis

Why do some people age in a healthy way while others don’t? This question is the driving force behind the Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging (CLSA). The first research study of its kind in Canada, the CLSA is collecting data from 51,000 participants aged 45 to 85 over a 20-year period to help pinpoint the physical, psychological, social, environmental, economic, and lifestyle factors that affect how people age. What we learn from the CLSA over the next 20 years will help to improve the aging experience for people in Canada and around the world. The hope is to change the way we live and our approach to growing older.

I sat down with Jamie O’Donnell, in-home interviewer for the CLSA and long-term resident and member of the Crown Point community. I asked Jamie to share his insights as a CLSA employee who works directly with participants residing in Hamilton.


Get your copy of The Point coming in October to get the whole story.

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